Project Completed for Wild & Scenic Rivers

Our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers

Wild and Scenic Rivers

Hard to believe I’m approaching my 10 year anniversary as a member of Adventure Scientist. Over that decade I’ve been lucky enough to participate in a variety of citizen science projects that have taken me from remote Alaskan islands to the top of volcanos. Our latest project with them was the Wild and Scenic Rivers project. 

I wrote an article about the details of the project here. If you think this might be something you’d be interested in then you’ll also find some links on how to apply. 

WSR Project
Steve getting ready to add the acid to the last grab sample of the day.

Our Experience

We volunteered for the Suiattle River which is located in the North Cascades of Washington state. We were able to make multiple collection trips to the river in a variety of weather; from sunny days to fog and rain. 

Of course, the hardest trip was the first trip as we had to make multiple attempts to find a suitable collection site. The site needed to meet the requirements for a successful collection process and be safe at the same time. With the volume and speed at which the Suiattle runs that was a bit of a big order to fill. But once we found our site and marked it on our GPS it was routine from that point on. 

The routine is to get yourself settled in an area where the flow is running. Then we fill rinse and fill three sample bottles with river water. These we pack away in a cooler filled with ice packs and which will be shipped overnight freight to a lab in Colorado. 

Then using two separate probes we measure various data points of the river such as acidity, temperature, dissolved oxygen levels etc. All of this gets entered into an application on our phone and upload to the cloud once we get back to an area with cell coverage.  The last piece is to take photos of the banks and vegetation and describe the area. 

I’m happy to report that our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers. Almost five times the number from the previous year.

Support

Our mission is a labor of love, but it does come with overhead. If you’d like to support our efforts we’d certainly appreciate it. Currently, we’re actively participating in the following field research:

  • COASST Beached Bird Surveys
  • Wild and Scenic River Project

Thank you.

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Our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers

Steve Weileman

Member of the following

We are the learned society for geography and geographers.
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Working to provide opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts to make a difference as they play in the outdoors.
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Working to translate long-term monitoring into effective marine conservation solutions.
Sea Grant Washington
Provide integrated research, communication, and education to coastal communities that lead to the responsible use of the nation’s oceans.

Latest Instagram

Toleak Beach is located on the coast of Washington. The sea stacks in the background are part of the Giant's Graveyard. ...

This Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) was unusually relaxed during our hike out on the Nisqually Wildlife Refuge boardwalk. We almost tripped over him before noticing him. Never could see what he was so intently looking at. ...

Mt. Rainier as seen from the mouth of the Nisqually Delta. ...

Sunset over the Pacific on Washington's coast. ...

Just published our latest adventure, or maybe misadventure. You can find the link in my bio up top. - "A Regenerating Dip in Coldwater Lake" ...

Here's my latest news article regarding the world of citizen-science | "A Summer of Wild and Scenic Rivers" ...

Lake Crescent after the big wind storm we had last night. We got hammered on the beach, losing our weather station from atop the RV. I was recording gust of nearly 40 before we lost our instrumentation. However, all’s good this morning. ...

Pinto Falls in Gifford Pinchot National Forest. This little hidden ravine sits on an otherwise nondescript hillside. Never know what you’re going to find. ...

Took advantage of the clear skies and set up a day camp on the Washington coast. After a week of forest fire haze, it was a relief to see blue on the horizon. ...

The North Head lighthouse was built in 1989 just north of the Columbia River on the Washington coast. ...

Just published our latest adventure - "A Night at Dusty Lake" - You can find the link in my bio up top. ...

Lewis & Clark had their dog, 'Seaman’ and we have 'Ghost' to round out our team of explorers. Pinto Falls is in the background. A big thanks to Brad for bringing him along. ...

Tower Rock in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. This monolith soars 2000' above the Cispus Valley floor. ...

Sunrise from basecamp over Tower Rock in the background. Are we sure this is October? ...

Made it to the top of Burley Mountain and the fire lookout there. Mt. Rainier in the background. ...

What’s Next

The project wrapped up in September with us shipping our probes back to headquarters to be recalibrated for the next round.

However, we’ve been asked to participate in a winter collection effort which I’m happy to say we accepted eagerly. I’m not sure what to expect from the North Cascades in winter, but we’ll jump in with both feet and see what Mother Nature brings. Stay tuned for more updates.

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