Project Completed for Wild & Scenic Rivers

Our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers

Wild and Scenic Rivers

Hard to believe I’m approaching my 10 year anniversary as a member of Adventure Scientist. Over that decade I’ve been lucky enough to participate in a variety of citizen science projects that have taken me from remote Alaskan islands to the top of volcanos. Our latest project with them was the Wild and Scenic Rivers project. 

I wrote an article about the details of the project here. If you think this might be something you’d be interested in then you’ll also find some links on how to apply. 

WSR Project
Steve getting ready to add the acid to the last grab sample of the day.

Our Experience

We volunteered for the Suiattle River which is located in the North Cascades of Washington state. We were able to make multiple collection trips to the river in a variety of weather; from sunny days to fog and rain. 

Of course, the hardest trip was the first trip as we had to make multiple attempts to find a suitable collection site. The site needed to meet the requirements for a successful collection process and be safe at the same time. With the volume and speed at which the Suiattle runs that was a bit of a big order to fill. But once we found our site and marked it on our GPS it was routine from that point on. 

The routine is to get yourself settled in an area where the flow is running. Then we fill rinse and fill three sample bottles with river water. These we pack away in a cooler filled with ice packs and which will be shipped overnight freight to a lab in Colorado. 

Then using two separate probes we measure various data points of the river such as acidity, temperature, dissolved oxygen levels etc. All of this gets entered into an application on our phone and upload to the cloud once we get back to an area with cell coverage.  The last piece is to take photos of the banks and vegetation and describe the area. 

I’m happy to report that our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers. Almost five times the number from the previous year.

Our volunteers collected water quality data from 128 Wild and Scenic Rivers, enabling federal and state agencies to improve accountability and inform river policy, protection, and management decisions.

Our Timber Tracking volunteers collected samples from 787 locations (and counting!) across the range of eastern black walnut, enabling the US Forest Service and US Fish and Wildlife Service to combat illegal logging.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration incorporated our microplastics data into their global marine microplastics dataset. 

advertisement

Our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers

Steve Weileman

Member of the following

We are the learned society for geography and geographers.
as-seal-gr
Working to provide opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts to make a difference as they play in the outdoors.
coasst-logo
Working to translate long-term monitoring into effective marine conservation solutions.
Sea Grant Washington
Provide integrated research, communication, and education to coastal communities that lead to the responsible use of the nation’s oceans.

Latest Instagram

Sunset over James Island on the Washington Coast. Looking forward to getting out there this month for our #COASST survey ...

This fountain is often thought to portray Venus, the Roman goddess of love, or Galatea, a sea nymph from Greek mythology. In 1893 the statue first appeared at the World Columbian Exposition in Chicago's German Pavilion. ...

It’s been awhile but we’re here on Marrowstone Island for a little winter camping. ...

Historic High Rock Lookout with Mt Rainier in the background. It's a bit of a steep hike to get here, but so worth the effort. ...

A shot from above of Iron Creek waterfall located in Gifford Pinchot National Forest. ...

With all the sub-freezing weather and snow we've had lately, I'm missing my Costa Rica and our encounters with White-faced Capuchins in Manuel Antion National Park. They did everything they could to liberate us from our lunch. It was certainly touch-and-go! ...

After four days of below-freezing weather, our local lake is starting to show signs of cold weather. ...

Just published our latest adventure - " WSR Winter Collection" - You can find the link in my bio up top. ...

The Suiattle River during our last Wild and Scenic River fieldwork. The snow made for a beautiful backdrop and it also made for cold hands during the river sampling. ...

On the Suiattle River collecting data for the Wild and Scenic River project. The snow made for a very picturesque scenic but the cold temperatures were a little hard on the hands. 🙂 ...

The sun made a short appearance this weekend just while we were exploring North Cove. This place has the dubious distinction of losing the most coastline in the US. On average 150' per year. They've lost neighborhoods, hotels, cemeteries, and a lighthouse. ...

Just published our latest adventure - " Returning to La Push for Surveys" - You can find the link in my bio up top. ...

A rare clear evening out on Washington's coast. The Olympic National Park has miles of coastline to enjoy. ...

Enjoying a bit of warmth on a cold clear winter's evening on the Olympic Coast. We don't get many days like this in the winter. ...

Setting up camp at Toleak Beach on the Washington coast. We took advantage of the clear but cold winter weather and hiked in the day before our #COASST bird survey. ...

Snug Harbor Cannery on the southern half of Chisik Island. I spent a few years guiding out of the Alaskan treasure. ...

What’s Next

The project wrapped up in September with us shipping our probes back to headquarters to be recalibrated for the next round.

However, we’ve been asked to participate in a winter collection effort which I’m happy to say we accepted eagerly. I’m not sure what to expect from the North Cascades in winter, but we’ll jump in with both feet and see what Mother Nature brings. Stay tuned for more updates.

Please share this:

More to explore

feature

First Beach Cast Bird Found

I really don’t want to think about the number of miles or the total elevation lost and gained that were traveled to find our first bird but it finally paid off with the discovery of our first bird (and second) to document for the volunteer COASST program.

Read More »
blue-gray tanager
Science

Costa Rica: Blue-gray Tanager

While staying in the La Fortuna area of Costa Rica, we were walking back to the hotel when we heard this incredible bird song emanating from a dense tree. It was full of colorful Blue-Gray Tanager singing their hearts out.

Read More »
Sunset over James Island
Science

Another Run at Toleak Beach

What’s the saying about Murphy’s Law? Weather, tide….all was in our favor I was thinking what a great day, that’s when Murphy’s Law kicked in.

Read More »

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.