Project Completed for Wild & Scenic Rivers

Our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers

Wild and Scenic Rivers

Hard to believe I’m approaching my 10 year anniversary as a member of Adventure Scientist. Over that decade I’ve been lucky enough to participate in a variety of citizen science projects that have taken me from remote Alaskan islands to the top of volcanos. Our latest project with them was the Wild and Scenic Rivers project. 

I wrote an article about the details of the project here. If you think this might be something you’d be interested in then you’ll also find some links on how to apply. 

WSR Project
Steve getting ready to add the acid to the last grab sample of the day.

Our Experience

We volunteered for the Suiattle River which is located in the North Cascades of Washington state. We were able to make multiple collection trips to the river in a variety of weather; from sunny days to fog and rain. 

Of course, the hardest trip was the first trip as we had to make multiple attempts to find a suitable collection site. The site needed to meet the requirements for a successful collection process and be safe at the same time. With the volume and speed at which the Suiattle runs that was a bit of a big order to fill. But once we found our site and marked it on our GPS it was routine from that point on. 

The routine is to get yourself settled in an area where the flow is running. Then we fill rinse and fill three sample bottles with river water. These we pack away in a cooler filled with ice packs and which will be shipped overnight freight to a lab in Colorado. 

Then using two separate probes we measure various data points of the river such as acidity, temperature, dissolved oxygen levels etc. All of this gets entered into an application on our phone and upload to the cloud once we get back to an area with cell coverage.  The last piece is to take photos of the banks and vegetation and describe the area. 

I’m happy to report that our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers. Almost five times the number from the previous year.

Support

Our mission is a labor of love, but it does come with overhead. If you’d like to support our efforts we’d certainly appreciate it. Currently, we’re actively participating in the following field research:

  • COASST Beached Bird Surveys
  • Wild and Scenic River Project

Thank you.

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Our efforts, along with the rest of the teams of volunteers, paid off with over 570 completed reports from 91 rivers

Steve Weileman

Member of the following

We are the learned society for geography and geographers.
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Working to provide opportunities for outdoor enthusiasts to make a difference as they play in the outdoors.
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Working to translate long-term monitoring into effective marine conservation solutions.
Sea Grant Washington
Provide integrated research, communication, and education to coastal communities that lead to the responsible use of the nation’s oceans.

Latest Instagram

A kayaker making his way across Coldwater Lake with the crater of Mt. St. Helens in the background. ...

On May 16, 1898, the North Head Lighthouse was put into service as the primary navigation aid at the mouth of the Columbia River and still stands as a sentinel overlooking this treacherous body of water, the confluence between the Columbia River and the Pacific Ocean. ...

This root was near our campsite. I was intrigued because it looks like an entire forest wrapped around it. ...

Mt. St. Helens seen from Windy Ridge. ...

Cispus River with Tower Rock in the background. Our camp was locate on the banks of the river. ...

River bank of the Cispus River inside the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. ...

Headed back to Mt. St. Helens for the weekend. Hoping to visit some of our favorite places as well as discover new ones. ...

Buck Creek is one of the many waterways that feed the Suiattle River. We spotted this view during our last Wild and Scenic Rivers fieldwork. ...

During our recent Wild and Scenic River Survey we had the opportunity to do a bit of exploring. Here's Buck Creek which drains into the Suiattle River. ...

Theresa taking a sample for the Wild and Scenic Rivers project with Adventure Scientist. We'll be heading out to the Suiattle River this weekend for another round of data. ...

Looking out over Crescent Bay from Tongue Point. We recently experienced the lowest tides in a decade here in Washington. ...

Did our #COASST bird survey this weekend during some of the lowest tides in a decade. We could have walked out to the sea stacks off shore which I’ve never seen exposed like this. Of course, what goes out must come in…so we didn’t. ...

Red Sky in the Morning... it's supposed to be a warning, but I'll take it. ...

Wild and Scenic Rivers Project - Getting the collection gear and probes ready for tomorrows survey. Looks like we’ll get a break in the weather during the morning hours so that’s when we’ll be heading out. Looking forward to seeing what changes Mother Winter has wrought on the Suiattle River. ...

Headed back to the North Cascades to resume our Wild and Scenic River Surveys. ...

We’ll be shortly resuming our data collection for the #getwildandscenic project on the Suiattle River. Sensors have been calibrated and sent to us along with all our water sample collection bottles and chemicals. Looking forward to getting back out into the North Cascades. ...

What’s Next

The project wrapped up in September with us shipping our probes back to headquarters to be recalibrated for the next round.

However, we’ve been asked to participate in a winter collection effort which I’m happy to say we accepted eagerly. I’m not sure what to expect from the North Cascades in winter, but we’ll jump in with both feet and see what Mother Nature brings. Stay tuned for more updates.

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