Discovering Pleasant Surprises on NF52

Somehow this seasonal road that connects the entrance to Mt. Rainier and Gifford Pinchot National Forest has stayed off my radar. What a shame, because it has quite a few surprises.

National Forest Road 52

With two weeks supporting the AVO (Alaska Volcano Observatory) team in Alaska just around the corner, Theresa and I were hoping to get away and do a bit of camping away from the crowded State Parks. A quick glance at the Hipcamp page and I found this great camp just outside of the Mt. Rainier National Park. Wilderness Path fit the bill, but what I wasn’t expecting was the gem of NF52.

NF-52 is a National Forest Service road that connects Ashford and Packwood. I was surprised by the many dispersed campsites along the road. Most had access to Skate Creek which parallels the road and despite it being a summer weekend many were available on a Saturday morning.

If you decide to explore this area, and you should, just be aware that it is a seasonal road which is closed in the winter. You can read any closures and alerts here.

High Rock Lookout

By far the highlight of the trip was visiting the High Rock Lookout. Undoubtedly one of the most spectacular lookouts in America, High Rock is in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest just south of Mt. Rainier National Park. The 14′ x 14′ gable roof L-4 ground house with catwalk was built in 1929 and staffed the same year it’s last officially sanctioned use was in 2003 when Lawrence “Bud” Panco “retired” after 17 seasons serving as the volunteer fire observer at High Rock. It is perched on the edge of a 1200′ sheer cliff. The historic site is carefully maintained by the Forest Service and is reached by a 1.6-mile trail which is usually free of snow by July 1.

Somehow this seasonal road that connects the entrance to Mt. Rainier and Gifford Pinchot National Forest has stayed off my radar. What a shame, because it has quite a few surprises.

Somehow this seasonal road that connects the entrance to Mt. Rainier and Gifford Pinchot National Forest has stayed off my radar. What a shame, because it has quite a few surprises.

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Theresa is looking downstream at Murhat Falls. This waterfall is easy to drive to and an easy hike in the Olympic National Forest. ...

Skate Creek runs alongside Forest Road 52 in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest. This was just one of the many photographic sites that can be accessed from the road. ...

Murhut Falls and its pool are nestled in the Olympic National Forest, not far from Dosewallips State Park. ...

Winter storm making landfall just south of Cape Flattery. This part of the Pacific Northwest can see some powerful storms. ...

An unnamed creek and a small waterfall that you can find along the Steam Donkey Loop trail, which starts within the Dosewallips State Park of Washington ...

Footsteps and a sunset over the Pacific Ocean. ...

Early morning sunshine filtered through the trees and reflected off the upper portion of Murhut waterfall ...

Theresa sitting under Murhut Falls, enjoying the beauty of the forest. ...

Found this small dam in the hills behind our camp on Hood Canal. At one time, it appears to have been used by a homestead to hold water during the summer months. #washingtonstateparks ...

A photographer takes a photo and becomes the subject himself. ...

“How We Survived a Slight Derailment on Tower Rock” was published on our website. You'll find a gallery of all photographs in the article towards the bottom of the page. I'd love to hear your thoughts or comments. You can find our URL in the bio. ...

Low tide on Crescent Bay and reflections in the pools left behind. ...

Back when the lookout was constructed folks had to hike over 10 miles to reach this jagged summit. But over the decades’ roads were punched closer to this peak for timber extraction. The days of the big cut are over in the Gifford Pinchot National Forest, and the Sawtooth Ridge still retains some healthy stands of old-growth forest. But what hikers are most drawn to when they visit High Rock are its far-reaching and unsurpassed views.

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Surprisingly, during our visit not only did we have clear skies to take in the view, but the wind was dead calm. I can’t imagine that happens many days out of the year! We certainly took advantage of it and extended our stay for much of the afternoon. No matter which direction we turned to look there was some incredible view to greet us. With such grand views, our lunch tasted all the better.

If time and commitments permit we’ll be back soon.

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